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Humans of Harker: Blazing a path forward

Jason Huang takes life by the reins

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Humans of Harker: Blazing a path forward

“For me at least, I get this feeling when I know I helped out someone else where I’m like ‘dang, I made a difference.’ That’s important to me. Because I think I realize how much people have helped me get to where I am today. Teachers, parents, mentors. I think I want to give that back,

“For me at least, I get this feeling when I know I helped out someone else where I’m like ‘dang, I made a difference.’ That’s important to me. Because I think I realize how much people have helped me get to where I am today. Teachers, parents, mentors. I think I want to give that back," Jason Huang (12) said.

Jessie Wang

“For me at least, I get this feeling when I know I helped out someone else where I’m like ‘dang, I made a difference.’ That’s important to me. Because I think I realize how much people have helped me get to where I am today. Teachers, parents, mentors. I think I want to give that back," Jason Huang (12) said.

Jessie Wang

Jessie Wang

“For me at least, I get this feeling when I know I helped out someone else where I’m like ‘dang, I made a difference.’ That’s important to me. Because I think I realize how much people have helped me get to where I am today. Teachers, parents, mentors. I think I want to give that back," Jason Huang (12) said.

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Jason Huang (12) grew serious as he told a story of visiting a run-down little village in the depths of rural China. He was seven or eight years old, and the village didn’t really have running electricity, and most houses didn’t even have access to clean water. That was his father’s home town, and some of his extended family still lived there. The sight left a profound impression on the young boy, setting him on the path he now treads.

“[Seeing that village] really showed me the opportunities and advantages I enjoy in life and that there are significant inequalities in this world and there are people who lack a lot of resources and who lack a lot of opportunity.” Jason said. “And that experience really motivated me to go into the nonprofit sector to do social work. I feel that [now] I definitely do a lot more, and I’m incentivized to use my opportunities to create a change in the world, to help out those people I saw.”

This resolve led Jason to become more involved in service and changed his mindset towards his life and his future goals. He became more active in clubs and started taking more responsibility upon himself.

“My motto is ‘If you can’t find a way, make a way,’” Jason said. “And it’s based off my hero, Hannibal Barca, a Carthaginian general who I really look up to. I really live by that because beforehand, I sometimes gave up a little bit too easily, and I think it’s important to take a stand for what I believe in a lot of times, and when I do that…I get more results, and I feel more fulfilled and happy.”

And in order to help those less fortunate than him, Jason did just that. He founded Nanoseed, a non-profit organization that gives student and entrepreneurial grants to poor rural Chinese. Jason has personally led teams to rural China, interviewing hundreds of families and giving out tens of thousands in student grants for college tuition, high school tuition, agricultural initiatives and more. Yanbao, the second largest nonprofit in China, even became a sponsor for his program, providing Nanoseed with money and logistical support.

“It’s having that recognition of may work that’s so fulfilling. At this point it’s not just like ‘hey, you’re doing service work.’ It’s that you’re being recognized for doing good work.” Jason said.
Jason applies the same attitude he has towards service to everyday life, striving to maintain a cheerful and optimistic attitude towards the future.

“He goes out of the way to do stuff he enjoys,” David Melisso (12), who’s known Jason since middle school, said. “And if he has an idea that he wants to implement, he will not let people get in his way. He’s very determined. Not stubborn, but if he wants to do something he’ll do it.”

This attitude is a result of Jason’s own belief that every day should be just as fulfilling as the last. He wants to lead a fun life, always living each day to the fullest.

“You know how there’s this philosophy where you work your ass off for ten years, you have a terrible life, and then ten years later you’re able to enjoy life? I think [my] shift in mindset was when I realized ‘I don’t want that sort of life, I can make every day fun, I can be proud of myself every day.’” Jason said.

Jason strives to be open and honest with his friends, as well as helping out wherever he can. Suraj Pakala (12), a close friend of Jason’s, recalled a time when he went mountain biking with Jason and another friend before junior year.

“I went down this hill, slid on the ground, and my bike flipped over myself, and I completely destroyed my knee, and [Jason] gave me some water and just helped me through the entire thing.” Suraj said. “While other people on the mountain were just standing there laughing at us, he was there helping out, not even caring what other people think. I’m pretty grateful for that.”

Jay Menon(12), a friend of Jason’s, thinks that he’s a genuine person who’s always eager to try something new.

“Jason’s a pretty happy person, he’s pretty positive, he always wants to have fun.” Jay said. “Even if he’s upset about something, he rarely dwells on it. He might get mad or something, but he’s never depressed. Hes always very cheerful and excited about whatever he’s doing.”

Ultimately, Jason wants to lead an enjoyable life, making the world a better place and helping other people.

“For me at least, I get this feeling when I know I helped out someone else where I’m like ‘dang, I made a difference.’” He said. “That’s important to me. Because I think I realize how much people have helped me get to where I am today. Teachers, parents, mentors. I think I want to give that back.”

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Humans of Harker: Blazing a path forward