Special counsel did not find conspiracy or coordination between Russia and Trump campaign, Attorney General writes

The+letter+submitted+by+Attorney+General+William+Barr+to+Congress.+The+letter+was+later+disclosed+to+the+public+and+declares+that+the+special+counsel+did+not+find+any+knowing+coordination+between+the+Trump+campaign+and+Russia+during+the+2016+election.
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Special counsel did not find conspiracy or coordination between Russia and Trump campaign, Attorney General writes

The letter submitted by Attorney General William Barr to Congress. The letter was later disclosed to the public and declares that the special counsel did not find any knowing coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election.

The letter submitted by Attorney General William Barr to Congress. The letter was later disclosed to the public and declares that the special counsel did not find any knowing coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election.

The letter submitted by Attorney General William Barr to Congress. The letter was later disclosed to the public and declares that the special counsel did not find any knowing coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election.

The letter submitted by Attorney General William Barr to Congress. The letter was later disclosed to the public and declares that the special counsel did not find any knowing coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election.

by Ryan Guan, Executive News Editor

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The investigation of special counsel Robert Mueller did not find any knowing coordination between President Donald Trump’s campaign members and the Russian government, according to a letter sent to Congress from Attorney General William Barr that summarized Mueller’s confidential report, which was completed on Friday, about alleged Russian involvement in the 2016 presidential election.

The letter went on to describe two Russian efforts to influence the election, which were identified as “disinformation and social media operations in the United States designed to sow social discord” and “computer hacking operations designed to gather and disseminate information.”

Barr’s letter stated that the report did not conclude definitively whether or not Trump had been concerned with obstruction of justice, stating that “while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.” Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein decided that the evidence was not sufficient to say that Trump had committed obstruction of justice.