Harker Aquila

Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

Eric Wang reverse engineers inside and outside robotics

%E2%80%9C%5BReverse+engineering%5D+really+started+with+robotics%2C+there+was+one+team+that+brought+this+really+interesting+mechanism+to+the+world%2C%E2%80%9D+said+Eric.+%E2%80%9CI+could+just%2C+for+the+life+of+me%2C+not+figure+out+how+it+works.+So+I+took+a+couple+of+videos%2C+asked+them+for+a+couple+of+pictures%2C+and+I+spent+years+on+that.+Occasionally+I+would+spend+an+hour+or+so+looking+at+it%2C+trying+to+figure+out+how+it+works+and+a+year+or+two+later+I+finally+figured+out+how+it+works.+It+made+me+realize+that+I+love+figuring+things+out%2C%22+Eric+Wang+%2812%29+said.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

“[Reverse engineering] really started with robotics, there was one team that brought this really interesting mechanism to the world,” said Eric. “I could just, for the life of me, not figure out how it works. So I took a couple of videos, asked them for a couple of pictures, and I spent years on that. Occasionally I would spend an hour or so looking at it, trying to figure out how it works and a year or two later I finally figured out how it works. It made me realize that I love figuring things out,

“[Reverse engineering] really started with robotics, there was one team that brought this really interesting mechanism to the world,” said Eric. “I could just, for the life of me, not figure out how it works. So I took a couple of videos, asked them for a couple of pictures, and I spent years on that. Occasionally I would spend an hour or so looking at it, trying to figure out how it works and a year or two later I finally figured out how it works. It made me realize that I love figuring things out," Eric Wang (12) said.

Saloni Shah

“[Reverse engineering] really started with robotics, there was one team that brought this really interesting mechanism to the world,” said Eric. “I could just, for the life of me, not figure out how it works. So I took a couple of videos, asked them for a couple of pictures, and I spent years on that. Occasionally I would spend an hour or so looking at it, trying to figure out how it works and a year or two later I finally figured out how it works. It made me realize that I love figuring things out," Eric Wang (12) said.

Saloni Shah

Saloni Shah

“[Reverse engineering] really started with robotics, there was one team that brought this really interesting mechanism to the world,” said Eric. “I could just, for the life of me, not figure out how it works. So I took a couple of videos, asked them for a couple of pictures, and I spent years on that. Occasionally I would spend an hour or so looking at it, trying to figure out how it works and a year or two later I finally figured out how it works. It made me realize that I love figuring things out," Eric Wang (12) said.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






With the look of interest and wonder in his eyes, Eric Wang (12) ponders the complexities of common items such as door knobs and toilets to understand how they work and function as a quaint pastime. Reverse engineering, or understanding the process of creation of machines or utilities, is a hobby that Eric enjoys.

“I love reverse engineering things, and just figuring out how things work; how things, that people don’t really notice a lot, work,” said Eric.

The examination of common household objects and more complex instruments stemmed from his robotics program. He is involved in a private, outside of Harker, Robotics team called Paradigm Robotics. It is located at Kaushik Shivakumar (12) house, and he joined in ninth grade. Eric’s robotics partner, Rithvik Panchapakesan (12), comments on Eric’s hobby.

“It’s really important to understand how these other mechanisms work from different points of views, so I think he is really good at that. One of the big things of robotics is reverse engineering and I think we are all interested in that, but Eric has a really creative aspect to it.” Rithvik said. “Once he sees a mechanism he is able to know how it works and understand other concepts that other people have used. That’s helpful because when you understand a design, it helps us broaden our view and think of new designs.”

Kaushik points out Eric’s key attributes to their robotics program, which help the team succeed and come out polished and fine.

“Probably the most significant thing he has contributed to our club is his build quality. Everything is done with such care and attention to detail that, in its final form, the robot is very solid and very clean and it works as intended,” Kaushik said.

This fascination with breaking down objects to their core functions, along with his robotics interests, made him decide to take additional physics classes.

“After freshman physics, the next year I was like I want to take physics two because I thought maybe I could apply it in some way to robotics,” said Eric. “I’m going into mechanical engineering, so it will be lots of physics classes.”

Engineering, though intertwined with physics, helps with the overall understanding of robotics.

“Reverse engineering is a lot more intuitive, while physics is more theoretical; but in some ways it does help. But the class that I think really does help with it, and also vise versa, is engineering,” Eric said.

Eric’s Physics C teacher, Dr. Eric Nelson, describes Eric’s personality in class.

“He has an interesting collection of attributes. On one hand he aced the last lab report segment we did,” Dr. Nelson said. “He is stepping up to that writing style that I require which is postgraduate level. But on the other hand, I think his backpack has a portal to an alternate dimension because I’ve found that anything that goes in there will disappear for weeks at a time.”

Eric plans to take engineering classes in college and continue with the Paradigm robotics team, bringing his skills to aid next year’s team.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Left
  • Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

    Class of 2019

    Humans of Harker: Curiosity and confidence

  • Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

    Class of 2019

    Humans of Harker: Lending a hand

  • Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

    Class of 2019

    Humans of Harker: One step at a time

  • Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

    Class of 2019

    Humans of Harker: Flexible to change

  • Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

    Class of 2019

    Humans of Harker: Reaching out

  • Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

    Class of 2019

    Humans of Harker: Maintaining perspective

  • Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

    Class of 2019

    Humans of Harker: Roll, split and face

  • Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

    Class of 2019

    Humans of Harker: Calm and composed

  • Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

    Class of 2019

    Humans of Harker: The art of creation

  • Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker

    Class of 2019

    Humans of Harker: Collaboration

Navigate Right
The student news site of The Harker School.
Humans of Harker: Toy and Tinker